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Wildflower season is “past peak” and I’d like to remind you that the glorious, youthful, bright flowers now enter the very important stage of making and dispersing seed. Though my camera is still drawn to brightly colored flowers, I try to point it at the broken stems, brown seed pods, and graying leaves that are present in this phase of life.

The parallel to animals, including – no, especially – humans, is obvious. As we move from the giddy days of courtship to the more staid and serious time of being adults, a few gray hairs appear, some wrinkles become permanent changes to a previously unlined face, and the challenge is to  see the beauty that accompanies our own maturity. Of course, I am well beyond that time. Now my face is full of lines and creases, making it scary to use the magnifying side of the mirror. And if the sun shines right, my frizzy, white hair glows like a halo (but I know I’m no angel!). I don’t know about the rest of you, but for me, seeing the beauty in age does not get easier.

The following slideshow celebrates the mature seed-producing plants that were so spectacular just a few weeks ago. Enjoy!

Front yard

Front yard
Gilia capitata and Clarkia unguiculata along front sidewalk

Front yard

Front yard
Bright yellow of Diplacus clevelandii against browns, tans and grays of seeding wildflowers

Front yard

Front yard
Compare this picture with same shot last month.

Gilia capitata

Globe Gilia
Gilia capitata

Clarkia unguiculata, Gilia capitata

Mt. garland and globe gilia
Clarkia unguiculata, Gilia capitata

Keckiella cordifolia

Heartleaf penstemon
Keckiella cordifolia

Helianthus annuus

Wild sunflower
Helianthus annuus (early bloomer of this summer delight)

Phacelia tanacetifolia

Tansy-leaf phacelia
Phacelia tanacetifolia

Senecio palmeri

Guadalupe Island senecio
Senecio palmeri

Senecio palmeri

Guadalupe Island senecio
The blemishes on the petals of these later blooms of Senecio palmeri show their age

Senecio palmeri

Guadalupe Island senecio
Petals shrink as seeds, holding a little umbrella for flight, develop on Senecio palmeri

Penestemon heterophyllus

Margarita BOP penstemon
Penestemon heterophyllus

Gilia capitata

Globe gilia
Petals wilt as seed pods swell, Gilia capitata

Eschscholzia californica

Calif poppy
Seed pod of Eschscholzia californica

Peritoma arborea

Bladder pod
Blooms move out along the stem leaving behind large seed pod (bladder pods) of Peritoma arborea

Gambelia juncea

Baja snapdragon and bladder pod
Red flowers of Gambelia juncea add fire to the gray leaves and yellow Peritoma arborea.

Abutilon palmeri

Indian mallow
Apricot flowers of Abutilon palmeri

Diplacus 'Fiesta Marigold'

Monkeyflowers
Diplacus cultivars including ‘Fiesta Marigold’ continue to put on a show.

Front yard patio

Front yard patio
Pink Clarkia unguiculata still blooming. Compare with last month.

Eschscholzia californica

Calif poppies
Gray and fallen, I have been collecting poppy seeds (Eschscholzia californica) to sow in our nature park.

Front yard

Mt. garland and nasturtiums
Clarkia unguiculata and nasturtiums (weeds, that they are!) brighten the veg garden

Veg garden

Veg garden
Tomatoes, lettuce, Swiss chard, herbs, and more!

Check out this post on harvesting poppy seeds:

Cutting back poppies and harvesting seed

 

The post After the flowers appeared first on Weeding Wild Suburbia.



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